Tag Archives: jeeping

Tech Talk with Scott: Comparing Shocks

In the video below, Scott Carline, owner of Axleboy, examines the internal components of three common types of shocks and discusses various pros and cons to consider before making your next replacement or upgrade.

If you’ve ever wondered how your shocks work, why the ride quality is so much different from one shock to the next or why some shocks are so darn expensive, this video is for you.  Scott will go into detail looking at the following shocks:

  1. Twin-Tube
  2. Monotube
  3. Reservoir

 

What to expect at the Mid West Jeep Thing “Intro to Off-Road” Event

Twice a year, Mid West Jeep Thing (MWJT) and Axleboy team up to introduce new Jeep owners to the wonderful world of off-roading.  In our opinion, participating in a course like this is one of the best ways to become familiar with Jeep lifestyle, off-road etiquette and the capabilities of your stock to moderately lifted Jeep Wrangler.

Here’s what you can expect:
intro-to-offroad-1An Early Morning!

The Intro to Off-Road starts promptly at 9:00 am in Potosi, MO.  Depending on where you live, how long it takes to get going in the morning and how fast you drive, your day may start much earlier than usual.  If you’re coming from the St. Louis area, like we are, it’s safe to plan on about two hours of travel time.  The Axleboy crew typically leaves St. Peters around 6:30 am…but we’re also towing a trailer.

Class-room Type Instruction.

The first part of this course involves an interactive classroom style session where 24MWJT and Axleboy will discuss Tread Lightly guidelines, trail safety and a slew of information about “the modified Jeep.”

Lunch.

Immediately after the classroom portion, we’ll take a 30-45 minute lunch break.  This typically includes a burger, some chips and a soft drink or water.  Chow down and get ready to roll!

intro-to-offroad-31Demonstrations.

Towards the end of lunch, Scott Carline, owner of Axleboy demonstrates how and when to use an ARB tire deflator.  For those who have quick disconnects, Scott will also talk about when to disconnect and show how it is done.

Afternoon Trail Riding.

Organized trail riding is just that…organized.  Typically 3-4 experienced trail guides will be pre-selected to lead a group of 5-10 Jeeps on beginner trails with light to moderate obstacles.  During this time, you can expect to go up and down hills, around trees and over rocks of various sizes.  You may also hear a cacophony of creaks, clunks and other noises that are typical while traversing unpaved paths.

49A Dirty Jeep.

Come rain or shine, this event doesn’t get cancelled.  Come prepared to get dirty.

Photo Opportunities.

Organized Jeeping is slow and steady with plenty of opportunities to get out and take pictures of your Jeep and others going over obstacles.  Bring a camera or use your smart phone and get to know some of the people in your group.  You might be surprised how many awesome people are willing to exchange pictures after the event.

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Need more information? Click Here to see the MWJT Event Page.

Don't forget to wave.

The Jeep Wave

We recently had a new Jeep owner come in to Axleboy with a complaint about the “Jeep-wave”.

It doesn’t work” he said, “I wave at other Jeeps all the time and never get a wave back.  Don’t people do the Jeep wave anymore?

There is some speculation that the wave may have been around even longer than the Jeep brand itself.  Whether that is a fact or not, we really don’t know…but we do know that the Jeep-wave is very much alive and well within the local Jeep communities.

 

Why do some Jeep owners neglect to return the wave?

Maybe it’s just an off day.  Or perhaps they just weren’t paying attention when your drove by.  Also, depending on what forums you read, there are certain rules that determine which Jeeper should initiate a wave and whether you can expect a wave in return.

One Jeep page we found, JeepTalk.org, has an actual list of qualities to determine a Jeep’s level of awesomeness and corresponding wave hierarchy- based on vehicle appearance (is it muddy?), age (older is better) and modifications.  They indicate that some Jeeps may simply not qualify for a return wave based on low or negative scores.

 

Regardless of where your Jeep lands on the awesomeness scale, we remind all Jeep owners that when they purchased their Jeep, new or used, they implicitly agreed to carry on the tradition of the wave.  As a general rule, we encourage you not to be that Jeeper that leaves other folks hanging with their hand in the air.

 

Happy Jeeping!!

Jeep Wave

Ideal Season for Off-Roading?

Is there any one “ideal” season for off-roading? The answer to that question really depends on who is in the driver’s seat and how comfortable he/she is with the physical terrain.  Check out the seasonal pros and cons of Jeeping and tell us on Facebook what season you prefer: Winter, Spring, Summer or Fall.

Winter

Crawling through the snow dusted hills of Missouri and Illinois can be both breathtaking and exhilarating.  At the same time, off-roading in the winter presents some significant challenges.  Most trails are not well maintained, if maintained at all, in the winter months and if there is any significant snow accumulation, accurately judging the surrounding surface conditions can be next to impossible.

If you plan to go off-roading in the winter, the experts at Axleboy suggest: sticking to familiar trails, going with a group (or at least with another experienced Jeeper) and go prepared to deal with extreme temperatures.  Adding cold and moisture to a familiar trail can change the entire off-road experience and potentially leave your vehicle stranded, so plan ahead and use good judgment.

Spring

Go Off-Road with Axleboy

Spring can a great time to ride.  Once the winter frost has passed and the ground begins to thaw, it can be awfully tempting to head out and find the nearest trail.  With tree leaves just beginning to bud, and new grass painting the world green, a short ride can be both refreshing and fun.

The only downside to taking a Spring ride may be dealing with frequent rain showers and the resulting mud.  We suggest a good set of tires to help maintain traction, a trusty winch and a planned trip to the carwash.  Stop by Axleboy or shop our online store for your upgrades today.

Summer

With warmer, dryer, summer weather the most popular trails are sure to be packed almost every weekend.  If you don’t mind dealing with the heat, humidity and crowds of other Jeepers, or if you have your own secluded sweet spot, Summer may be your ticket to a sweet ride.

The biggest issue we’ve noticed, when riding in the summer, is a lack of adequate preparation.  Severe sun-burn , dehydration and heat stroke are more common that most people may suspect.  We suggest bringing sunscreen, protein rich food and plenty of water to keep you hydrated.

Fall

Cooler weather, fewer bugs and the scenic view of leaves changing color make Fall one of the most popular times to ride the trails.  It’s a great time to get outside and enjoy as much of nature as possible before the onslaught of winter.

Much like Summer, trails in the Fall are likely to see a lot of traffic.   Some of us are veteran Jeepers and others are just novices, but we’re all out there to have a good time.   We suggest a healthy dose of patience.  In addition to crowded trails, new fallen foliage may begin to accumulate on the trail.  The experts at Axleboy suggest adding a few lbs. of extra weight to your vehicle for increased traction.

 

Is one season better than all the others?  Come by the shop and chat, or leave us a comment on Facebook.

 

 

Olympic Off-Roading? Maybe Someday.

This month families and friends across the globe will gather around the television to watch skiing, skating, curling, hockey and sledding.  We’ll cheer on our favorites as they exhibit professional prowess and our national pride will swell with each victory.  Some of us may feel so inspired by these athletes that we take up new hobbies in emulation.

What does it take to become an Olympic sport?  The International Federation (IF), responsible for making that determination published a report outlining the following critical components, including:

  • History and Tradition
  • Universality & Popularity
  • Environmental Impact
  • General Costs

You can read the entire listing of criteria on the official Olympics website.  At Axleboy, we’re not really into all the figure skating and curling.  What we would like to see is an event for winter off-roading.  This event is rich with history and tradition, widely popular across all classes, requires great skill and maneuverability and, if done in the winter, would have little to no impact on the natural environment.

What would you rather watch: Curling (sliding rocks across the ice) or Off-Roading (awesome vehicles, custom designed to maneuver over rock-strewn landscapes, valleys and mud pits)?  If enough people show interest, maybe we’ll see a new Olympic sport at the next games.